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Li Wenzu, wife of lawyer Wang Quanzhang who was arrested in the 709 Crackdown, started her march, from the Beijing Municipal High Court to the Tianjin No.2 Intermediate People's Court to search for her husband. On April 9, 2018, Day 6 of the march, she was kidnapped by a group of Tianjin domestic security personnel and taken to Douzhangzhuang police substation in the Wuqing District of Tianjin.

The brief profiles of the 47 individuals below are organized into two groups: (A) Prosecuted for organizing/planning the July 2020 unofficial primary, and (B) Prosecuted for participating as a candidate in the July 2020 unofficial primary.

They are listed in alphabetical order by their last names. All information is compiled from publicly available sources, many of which are in Chinese.

All information, including quotes of the individuals, has been compiled from published sources.

Please see below for links to some of the more frequently referred to laws and  regulations on our website, grouped by topic.

After 37 days of detention, five women activists, Li Tingting (李婷婷), Wu Rongrong (武嵘嵘), Zheng Churan (郑楚然), Wei Tingting (韦婷婷), and Wang Man (王曼), were “released upon guarantee pending further investigation” (取保候审) on April 13, 2015.

 

Lawyers' March for Judicial Independence, June 27, 2014

A statement in the white paper requiring judges to be patriotic also prompted a strong reaction from Hong Kong’s legal community. On June 27, 2014, more than 1,000 Hong Kong lawyers—as many as 1,800 by some estimates—marched to protest what they saw as Beijing’s interference in Hong Kong’s judicial independence.

June Fourth refers to the June 3-4, 1989 government military crackdown that ended the large-scale, peaceful protests in Beijing and other cities that spring and early summer. Despite persistent citizen demands for the truth and an accounting of the bloodshed, the authorities have offered nothing beyond their characterization that the protests were “counterrevolutionary riots”—a  label they later changed to “political disturbance” (政治风波)—which “the Party and state suppressed by using decisive measures.” (党和国家采取果断措施平息).

China faces a growing environmental crisis forcing a critical review of not only its economic growth model but also its ability to implement political and judicial reforms. China's rapid development has been fueled by energy-intensive, high-emission manufacturing and other industries, which rely primarily on polluting sources of energy. A transportation boom and the large number of cars on the road further contribute to pollution. Rapid urbanization leads to greater energy consumption and places additional burden on the environment.

Official Documents and Civil Society Submissions

Human rights defenders play a critical role in ensuring peaceful exercise of rights and promoting an independent civil society. As China’s civil society faces increasingly steep restrictions, human rights defenders have become the targets of draconian and comprehensive crackdowns. For their efforts, many human rights defenders have lost their jobs, family members, and personal freedom; many suffer mistreatment and torture in prison.

Last updated: December 13, 2021

The case is also known as the “Changsha Funeng” case.

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